Author Topic: Smaller Questions  (Read 8734 times)

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Qvaak

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Smaller Questions
« on: September 05, 2011, 03:51:09 pm »
Not all the interesting things make good blog post topics. Still they might be worth asking and, consequently, worth bringing up in a blog posts. Nothing is too insignificant for Small Questions thread.

Keep lengthy discussions on the other threads, please; this is a clean & simple questions thread. Also, if you think your peers (eg. me or ingsve) will probably already know the answers, you might ask your questions first at the beginners section or visit the IRC channel, and if our limited knowledge does not satisfy, then ask here.
Game of Thrones is not The Song of Ice and Fire, sweetling. You'll learn that one day to your sorrow.

Daenerys

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2011, 07:40:36 pm »
My small question is are there different greetings for different times of the day? Would there be a difference between greeting someone let's say in your family in the morning versus someone on the road?:)

Daenerys

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2011, 10:40:15 am »
Another tiny question - the word for "market". I didn't see it in the dictionary and there should be a word since they go to the Western Market in Vaes Dothrak.  :)

(Yes, it's all about shopping! I mean er trading!  :P  )

Daenerys

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2011, 10:52:38 am »
Is there a word or phrase for, "I miss you"? :)

Daenerys

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2011, 10:55:45 am »
Since according to the books, "me nem nessa" that the Dothraki pray to a horse god. What is the verb "to pray"? :)

ingsve

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2011, 07:25:18 pm »
Do we know all there is to know about adverbs?

-They are generally sentence final.
-They don't decline.
-Some come right after the verb (like vosecchi). Are there any more examples that follow this pattern?
-Some come in front of the adjective they are modifying.
-Postpositional particles are adverblike.

Is there anything more that applies to adverbs?
"I just need to rest, that’s all, to rest and sleep some, and maybe die a little" – Samwell Tarly

Hrakkar

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2011, 01:13:09 pm »
When is appropriate to use contractions? I understand, for instance, that m'athchomaroon is ma + athchomaroon

How do contractions affect pronunciation?
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ingsve

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2011, 09:36:06 pm »
Another thing I don't think we have yet is a way of creating new adverbs similar to the -ly suffix in English.
"I just need to rest, that’s all, to rest and sleep some, and maybe die a little" – Samwell Tarly

Daenerys

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2011, 06:58:14 pm »
Animals.

The list of animals we have are listed as animate and inanimate. Example  horse or a bee are "n" (since currently it isn't known which they would fall under) and a bear "na,", while a goat or a dog or rabbit was "ni."

Would animals in general be animate? Can you tell the difference if they are not?

ingsve

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2012, 02:35:26 pm »
I thought I'd put this forum section to use since we actually have it.

I have a question regarding whether it works to stress certain words in a sentence in Dothraki to highlight a specific meaning in what you're saying.

In English for example a sentence can take on slightly different meaning depening on what word in the sentence is emphasized:

Yes, that is my hat. 

Yes, that is my hat.

Yes, that is my hat.

Yes, that is my hat.

Yes, that is my hat.

Does this work in exactly the same way in Dothraki or are there occasions when you have to add words or change something to illustrate this type of slight difference in meaning?
"I just need to rest, that’s all, to rest and sleep some, and maybe die a little" – Samwell Tarly

Hrakkar

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #10 on: July 06, 2012, 10:50:22 pm »
Is zichome an example of a word where the stress goes on the penultimate syllable? It is the only word I have run into so far (other than the example given, a GRRM word, Tolorro that has the stress on the penultimate syllable.) where it is very obvious that the penultimate syllable is 'heavy'.
Don't tell Khal Drogo I am here ;)

ingsve

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2012, 01:56:31 am »
Is zichome an example of a word where the stress goes on the penultimate syllable? It is the only word I have run into so far (other than the example given, a GRRM word, Tolorro that has the stress on the penultimate syllable.) where it is very obvious that the penultimate syllable is 'heavy'.

No, zichome has the stress on the first syllable. Words are stressed on the penultimate syllable if they end in vowel-consonant-consonant-vowel.Other examples include haqeqqe, zhokakkwa,khalakka, kifindirgi, mawizzi etc.
"I just need to rest, that’s all, to rest and sleep some, and maybe die a little" – Samwell Tarly

Qvaak

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #12 on: July 07, 2012, 06:40:54 am »
Quote
Is zichome an example of a word where the stress goes on the penultimate syllable? It is the only word I have run into so far (other than the example given, a GRRM word, Tolorro that has the stress on the penultimate syllable.) where it is very obvious that the penultimate syllable is 'heavy'.
Quote
No, zichome has the stress on the first syllable. Words are stressed on the penultimate syllable if they end in vowel-consonant-consonant-vowel.Other examples include haqeqqe, zhokakkwa,khalakka, kifindirgi, mawizzi etc.
It's a bit more complicated than that.

When you determine syllabe weigth in Dothraki*, only the coda, the consonants following the vowel, matter. Zichome breaks down as zi-cho-me, so no consonants in any coda, no heavy syllabes.
Incidentally, ch is actually a digraph for a sigle phoneme, albeit affricate, so every syllabe is actually built roughly the same. On the other hand, idrie, for example, breaks down as i-dri-e, and the mid syllabe has truly a two consonant cluster on its onset. But while the middle syllabe is slightly more complex, it's still light and the stress is thus on the first syllabe.

[* As far as I understand, this isn't even that much language specific; it seems at least most languages are best analysed in this way, as far as syllabe weight is of concern.]

What makes things complicated is that it's not a trivial task to determine, whether a syllabe ends in consonant or not. Well, it's easy almost always - if there is less than two consonants between vowels, the former syllabe is always light; if there is a doubled consonant or more than two different consonants, the former syllabe is always heavy. But if there are two different consonants, you need to know the full syllabification system, sonority levels and all: http://wiki.dothraki.org/dothraki/Syllabification_and_Stress.

zi·cho·me
i·dri·e
am·mi·thra     <- hard to determine
as·sam·va     <- hard to determine
ki·fin·dir·gi     <- hard to determine
ma·wiz·zi
zho·kak·kwa
« Last Edit: July 07, 2012, 06:56:44 pm by Qvaak »
Game of Thrones is not The Song of Ice and Fire, sweetling. You'll learn that one day to your sorrow.

Death

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2012, 05:11:18 pm »
I thought I'd put this forum section to use since we actually have it.

I have a question regarding whether it works to stress certain words in a sentence in Dothraki to highlight a specific meaning in what you're saying.

In English for example a sentence can take on slightly different meaning depening on what word in the sentence is emphasized:

Yes, that is my hat. 

Yes, that is my hat.

Yes, that is my hat.

Yes, that is my hat.

Yes, that is my hat.

Does this work in exactly the same way in Dothraki or are there occasions when you have to add words or change something to illustrate this type of slight difference in meaning?

If I may, I believe that since Dothraki is based on cases, and thus, markers, it depends on the sentence order. I believe it's even written in the syntax.

If that's what you've meant.
Anha vojjor athdrivari ma khal rikh khadokhi; anha afich nakh mahrazhi.

Hrakkar

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Re: Smaller Questions
« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2012, 01:14:48 pm »
Keep in mind with Dothraki though, even though it does use noun cases, it does not have free word order. So, some other mechanism need to be used to emphasize an indea, such as choice of words, or perhaps verb classes.
Don't tell Khal Drogo I am here ;)