Author Topic: Dothraki dialogue from the TV series.  (Read 300241 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

ValekLost

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 34
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Dothraki Fan
    • View Profile
Re: Dothraki dialogue from the TV series.
« Reply #30 on: July 05, 2011, 03:53:54 pm »
Ah!
Ok, that makes sense.
I have always watched the show itself, without adding subtitles for the Italian, to mantain the hear for the English pronunciation.

Uhm...it could be also this.
I wonder about what fati means, as noun, since it could be used with the "X (is) Y" form.
Insult?
Slap?
Something more figurative?

It's not easy to guess. "She is..?"
what?

Now I'm very very curious XP

Jenny

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 37
  • Karma: +4/-0
    • View Profile
    • Na'vi Blog
Re: Dothraki dialogue from the TV series.
« Reply #31 on: July 06, 2011, 10:27:09 am »
-Rakharo: Hash shafka zali addrivat mae, zhey Khaleesi?? Do you want him dead khaleesi?

I was just looking through this thread, and I've got a question concerning this sentence above.
Zali comes from zalat, and from what I've understood, zalat's stem ends in a vowel. Zalat - lat = za
Therefore, shouldn't it then be, from this chart from the wiki, zae?
Or is zalat a verb with the stem ending with a consonant, as zal+at?

Quote
Person    Singular    Plural
First person   dothrak   dothraki
Second person   dothrae   dothrae
Third person   dothrae   dothrae

I've probably got this all wrong, so please explain  :)
« Last Edit: July 06, 2011, 10:28:51 am by Jenny »

ingsve

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 578
  • Karma: +9/-0
  • Student of the stars
    • View Profile
Re: Dothraki dialogue from the TV series.
« Reply #32 on: July 06, 2011, 10:44:02 am »
-Rakharo: Hash shafka zali addrivat mae, zhey Khaleesi?? Do you want him dead khaleesi?

I was just looking through this thread, and I've got a question concerning this sentence above.
Zali comes from zalat, and from what I've understood, zalat's stem ends in a vowel. Zalat - lat = za
Therefore, shouldn't it then be, from this chart from the wiki, zae?
Or is zalat a verb with the stem ending with a consonant, as zal+at?

Quote
Person    Singular    Plural
First person   dothrak   dothraki
Second person   dothrae   dothrae
Third person   dothrae   dothrae

I've probably got this all wrong, so please explain  :)

It's an unfortunate example since it's a verb with a stem that ends in an /-l/. So it is zal+at in this specific case.
"I just need to rest, that’s all, to rest and sleep some, and maybe die a little" – Samwell Tarly

Jenny

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 37
  • Karma: +4/-0
    • View Profile
    • Na'vi Blog
Re: Dothraki dialogue from the TV series.
« Reply #33 on: July 06, 2011, 10:53:26 am »
Thank you!

Jenny

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 37
  • Karma: +4/-0
    • View Profile
    • Na'vi Blog
Re: Dothraki dialogue from the TV series.
« Reply #34 on: July 07, 2011, 12:54:06 pm »
I have some more questions:

-Rakharo: Me dothrakhqoyoon torga Khali Bharbo. He was bloodrider to Khal Bharbo.
Why does he say khal-i?

-Rakharo: Vo mawizzi vekho jinne  There are no rabbits.
If Rakharo is talking about several rabbits, shouldn't that be third person plural then?
As in vekhi?

ingsve

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 578
  • Karma: +9/-0
  • Student of the stars
    • View Profile
Re: Dothraki dialogue from the TV series.
« Reply #35 on: July 07, 2011, 05:44:20 pm »
I have some more questions:

-Rakharo: Me dothrakhqoyoon torga Khali Bharbo. He was bloodrider to Khal Bharbo.
Why does he say khal-i?

-Rakharo: Vo mawizzi vekho jinne  There are no rabbits.
If Rakharo is talking about several rabbits, shouldn't that be third person plural then?
As in vekhi?

Torga is a preposition that assigns the genitive case which means that any noun that comes after it will be in genetive form. You have the same thing in german if you have ever studied that where certain prepositions assigns accusative or dative.

That's how David gave the line. I think it can be understood as "No rabbit is present here." which works the same whether you use plural or not. 
"I just need to rest, that’s all, to rest and sleep some, and maybe die a little" – Samwell Tarly

Qvaak

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 370
  • Karma: +29/-0
  • someone
    • View Profile
    • qvaak-dot-kuutikkaat
Re: Dothraki dialogue from the TV series.
« Reply #36 on: July 30, 2011, 10:13:20 pm »
I gave episodes three and six another diligent-ish read through, now that the text is pretty much thoroughly understandable - not just the words, but also the grammar.
Some fun things that popped out:

Questionable lines:

[...]vo ondeo[...] and Hash tihi? are curious, but those have already been discussed, and are for now simply categorized as ungrammatical.

We also just discussed case assignments of loy ...skipping that too...

Ishish chare acharoe hash me nem ejervae nharesoon.
"Maybe the ear will understand" is rather peculiar expression and could be idiomatic. As such it might take some poetic freedoms, so it's not the strongest example grammar-wise. But still, charolat looks a lot like a transitive verb, but seems to be used here without object. Proof that transitive verbs can drop the object without any major hassle? Supporting evidence at least.
Edit: OK. After some clarification (namely that charolat means "to listen") this is only half as peculiar as before, and charolat probably isn't even transitive.

Khaleesi vos zalo meme nem azisa.
Right now this is the wrong way rubbing line of the day. I remeber there was discussion about azisa, and after some misunderstandings it seemed very well explained. Now I read this and just can't stop thinking it must be wrong. To our knowledge zisat should be intransitive stative. [...]meme azisa. would make sense. [...]meme azisoe. might make even more sense. But how does the passive structure figure into this? I think the sentence should then be [...]meme nem azzisa. (or [...]meme nem vazzisa.) I think Peterson said that it is right the way it is... ah well.

Ma me nem ahakee ma Rhaego!
Do proper names decline? I think I might have seen a name in ablative or allative, but can't find any example now. AFAIK ma should assign genitive.

Qora mae!
Could this be right? Were qora an inanimate noun, I'd just assume this to be "His hands!" That would, in the context, make sense, and could even fairly reasonably be translated "Seize him!" Now, though, I think the stronger hypothesis is that the formal imperative agrees with plurals and that the plural in question is /-a/.


Lines I especially liked:

Ishish chare acharoe hash me nem ejervae nharesoon.
OK. This one again. Word play! So sweet. I also really like the meaning shift in chare->charat->charolat. The line is a bit like "Maybe the cognizance will recognize if it's disembodied." hehh..


Ave anni ezzo anhaan os lajataan.
Well, os lajataan is in itself quite simple and beautiful expression (well, fighting is not that beautiful thing per se, but in context of GoT and dothraki, it's completely acceptable). It also resonates well with ezzo. It's not exactly "My father made me find a path to fighting," but that's not too much off either.
Also: infinite of a verb nonchalantly used as a noun. Wow. You can do that?

Ogi loy mawizzi. ... Ezas loy alegri h'anhaan.
It's nice when the nuances in the text synch with the acting/story. Irri comes all formal and self assured, she's a handmaid of the friggin' khaleesi, after all. So she uses the formal, commanding imperative. Rakharo's dampening response has it's effect: The next command is already much more defensive and personal; Irri changes to regular informal imperative.

...meme zala rek meme nem jer ki mae.
Does anyone else find this just thoroughly hilarious? The difference between pronouns like "that" and "it" is rather subtle, and not exactly same in dothraki and english, so to slightly exaggerate, this goes somewhere between "...it-it wants it it-it was traded by it." and "...that-that wants that that-that was traded by that." No, really, it's a functional, understandable sentence.
Also: It seems jerat is syntactically closer to "buy" than "trade". Seems that the thing that is object of the trade is by default the thing that was got, not the thing that was given away. To my understanding in english this is rather the other way around.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2011, 04:56:27 pm by Qvaak »
Game of Thrones is not The Song of Ice and Fire, sweetling. You'll learn that one day to your sorrow.

Qvaak

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 370
  • Karma: +29/-0
  • someone
    • View Profile
    • qvaak-dot-kuutikkaat
Re: Dothraki dialogue from the TV series.
« Reply #37 on: October 05, 2011, 07:14:34 pm »
New words, episodes 9 and 10. These should be all, if I didn't miss any. I thought I'd drop these here before updating the wiki
Ep.10
! vineserat - to remember
! attihat - to show
? ayyey - always (This is most likely a temporalized ei.)
! ajjin - now
! yolat - to be born (past yol)
! arrek - then
Ep.9
! eth - must, have to (also 'th; this is a verbal auxiliary David has mentioned before, but it has never made it's way to the vocab)
hezhahat - to ride
vimithrerat - to camp
ziganesolat - to defy
? hammi - yak (the word is probaby in genitive, and would then be inanimate, so there's no telling about the final vowel.)
? ish - might (I think we've met this before (ishish at least is already known). Seems like another verbal auxilary, that would also have an elided form 'sh)
? nokittat - to trample
? qana - black stork (This seems to be in nominative, but animacy is of course a mystery)
javrathat - to rein
vosi - nothing (is this a pronoun or a noun? I'm a bit lost on categorization here)
? alle - further (this is pretty murky case. Doesn't look like a verb.)
! vezhak - horselord

Episode 8 (skipping a couple very weakly understrood):

tasokh - silk
taso - silk worm (this isn't really from the series, it's from the discussion, if memory serves)
? vafik - lamb girl (the exact meaning might be a bit off. Vezhak, vafik... animal people)
athlaqar - wailing
valzerikh - reason why
? qorasokh - prize (prize, swag, loot..?)
! ahhaz - then (more immediate then than arrek, it seems)
! acchakat - to silence
ohara - daugter
! qorasolat - to take (qoralat is perhaps more "to hold" than "to grasp")
! athvilajerar - war (it does not seem likely that this would be specifically "way of war")
? assandilat - to keep safe (this is quite questionable; might be vassandilat, might not even be verb. The sentence syntax is a bit blurry)
? jif - to be free to (I'm guessing this is yet another verbal auxilary, but even if it is, what exactly is the meaning?)
govat - to mate (of animals)
vafi - sheep (female, specifically, or so I think David told us. IRC always has multiple discussions overlapping)
! vadakherat - to feed (to dine?)
akkate - alike, the same way (from akat, I bet)
! sekosshi - surely, certainly
! ivezhofolat - to grow fierce
hazak - that one (the "one" is my emphasis. I guess these are only for persons)
rekak - that one (less present, from IRC chat)
jinak - this one (from IRC chat)
nirrat - to fill (curious. Why nirrat, not annirat?)
! eshna - another
inte - beetle
! adakhilat - to feed (to nibble?)
khewo - worm
vi - through (assigns allative)
eyel - rain
! arthasolat - to fall (what's the difference to arthasat)
ilek - skin (might miss a final vowel)
atte - first, firstly (adverb, I think)
! zisosh - scratch (ziso is probably a wound, then)
! finne - where (finne, jinne, rekke... hazze is pretty certain continuation)
koalak - healer
koalat - to be of help
! osto - bite
afis - fly
rhelat - to help
rhellay - help
affisat - clean
ziso - wound (ah, there we are. The final vowel in an educated guess)
« Last Edit: October 07, 2011, 12:54:21 pm by Qvaak »
Game of Thrones is not The Song of Ice and Fire, sweetling. You'll learn that one day to your sorrow.